Community Service – Solidaridad Y Voluntariado http://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/ Mon, 16 May 2022 17:28:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Community Service – Solidaridad Y Voluntariado http://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/ 32 32 Alexa Thoms is an Amazing Volunteer, Excels in Sports – Gig Harbor Now https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/alexa-thoms-is-an-amazing-volunteer-excels-in-sports-gig-harbor-now/ Mon, 16 May 2022 17:28:38 +0000 https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/alexa-thoms-is-an-amazing-volunteer-excels-in-sports-gig-harbor-now/ Gig Harbor Now publishes the profiles of each of the 25 honored students honored by the Greater Gig Harbor Foundation. Students will be honored at a banquet from 6-9 p.m. on Wednesday, May 18, 2022, at Ocean5, 5268 Point Fosdick Dr. Student: Alexa Thomas The school: Gig Harbor High School Category: Public Service Alexa Thoms […]]]>

Gig Harbor Now publishes the profiles of each of the 25 honored students honored by the Greater Gig Harbor Foundation. Students will be honored at a banquet from 6-9 p.m. on Wednesday, May 18, 2022, at Ocean5, 5268 Point Fosdick Dr.

Student: Alexa Thomas

The school: Gig Harbor High School

Category: Public Service

Alexa Thoms has an outstanding record of community service, including over 100 hours of volunteer work during the 2020-2021 school year.

Through the GHHS Interact Club, she has assisted with the Tacoma Rescue Mission, the Polio Foundation, Race for a Soldier, Turkey Trot, the ALS March, and the Basket Brigade.

She works a weekly shift at the FISH Food Bank and volunteers at National Honor Society events, while tutoring middle and high school students in Chinese and math.

She also plays trumpet in jazz band and cheer band GHHS, plays college tennis and football, and has maintained a 4.0 GPA. In fact, she ranks at the top of her class of 337 graduates.

Alexa Thomas

Alexa Thomas Contributed

Community impact

Alexa considers herself motivated to do a good job and get good grades because she participates in many extracurricular activities and sports. Of all the things she has done in the past four years, her favorites have been attending the GHHS Interact Club and playing women’s college football, she said, because of the friends she has. is done and the things she was able to accomplish in each activity.

His volunteer work has also been extremely satisfying.

“I’m very proud of the impact I’ve had in my community through the countless hours of volunteer work I’ve been able to rack up at the Fish Food Bank, Tacoma Rescue Mission, through Interact Club, and through tutoring, even during closure,” she said.

Those same things — volunteer work and maintaining her grades — also presented challenges, she said.

“My biggest challenge was adapting to the workload and the intensity of the classes. College didn’t prepare me very well to jump straight into honors and AP courses during my junior and sophomore years of high school.

For Alexa, coping with the pandemic shutdown hasn’t been difficult.

“It really wasn’t a problem for me because it just gave me more time to volunteer. I’ve kept myself busy, which helps me be more productive. I was able to continue volunteering, working two jobs and coaching soccer,” she said.

future surgeon

This fall, Alexa will go to the University of Utah to study biology with a pre-medical focus. His hope is to become a surgeon. Many of his high school courses focused on this goal, including specialized courses in anatomy and physiology and a college-level biology course. In all, she took seven AP courses and three honors courses, as well as the University of Washington course.

Her teachers are full of praise for Alexa’s efforts. Ramey Le Roy, head of the science department at GHHS, appreciated his willingness to participate and offer his thoughts on many different topics. “It allowed other students to share their views,” Le Roy said. “This was especially helpful during remote learning, as many students didn’t feel comfortable having discussions on Zoom. Alexa was opening the door to discussion, and her peers were following her lead.

Bryce Waddington, director of coaching at Gig Harbor Premier Soccer Club, called Alexa “a leader on and off the pitch, voted captain for the past seven years by her teammates, and is where other players can turn to. turn around for help. She consistently demonstrates her strong work ethic, intelligence and communication skills. Her upbeat personality and optimism rubs off on the young players” she coaches.

Alexa’s advice to young students is to “stay organized and on top of your work.” You should try to do this as early as possible so that you can enjoy the evening or the weekend without worrying about homework.

Alexa Thomas

The school: Gig Harbor High School

Category: Public Service

GPA: 4.0, leading in its class

Parents: Paul and Nicole Thomas

Activities: Academic letter for community service; Interact Club: volunteers with Turkey Trot, Basket Brigade, Tacoma Rescue Mission, ALS Walk, PenMet Parks, Polio Foundation, Race for a Soldier, FISH Food Bank; tutors for middle and high school students in Chinese and mathematics; vice-president of the National Honor Society (12); Girls Varsity Soccer – MVP, Best Offensive Player, Academic Excellence Award; Harbor Premier Soccer; JV and Varsity Tennis; Jazz and dynamic bands

Favorite teacher: “Mrs. Le Roy. She was always very friendly and caring; I always felt supported in her class and never had a problem with any concept because she was such an engaging and enthusiastic teacher. I sincerely believe that she is one of the best teachers in the district and i will continue to remember her as one of my best teachers.i am so glad my younger sister has her this year for biology.

The best thing about GHHS: “…our community. The teachers are great. My teachers never made school a job. They made it enjoyable and focused on learning. Besides the great teachers and administrative staff, everyone seems to support each other.

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Charles Robinson named professor emeritus at Clarkson University https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/charles-robinson-named-professor-emeritus-at-clarkson-university/ Sat, 14 May 2022 20:53:44 +0000 https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/charles-robinson-named-professor-emeritus-at-clarkson-university/ Clarkson University Herman L. Shulman Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director of the Center for Rehabilitation Engineering Professor Charles Robinson was named Professor Emeritus for his 17 years of exemplary service to the University. The official recognition will take place at the beginning on May 14th. Robinson has amassed a distinguished record of […]]]>

Clarkson University Herman L. Shulman Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director of the Center for Rehabilitation Engineering Professor Charles Robinson was named Professor Emeritus for his 17 years of exemplary service to the University. The official recognition will take place at the beginning on May 14th.

Robinson has amassed a distinguished record of excellence as a biomedical engineering generalist, rehabilitation engineering specialist, and neuroscientist. He has extensive experience in research and care services for people with neurological diseases and trauma, as well as leadership skills which he has employed as a volunteer in international volunteer societies.

As the Herman L. Shulman Endowed Chair, Robinson directed the Center for Rehabilitation Engineering, Science, and Technology at Clarkson, where he continued his efforts to help people with disabilities.

Until 2011, he concurrently held a position with the United States Department of Veterans Affairs as a Senior Rehabilitation Research Fellow, the first such fellow in the country, where he spent more than 30 years in various locations around the VA health care system serving disabled veterans. . He was also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at SUNY Upstate Medical University.

Prior to Clarkson, Robinson held teaching and research positions at schools of engineering, medicine, and allied health, including as director of the Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science at Louisiana Tech University, where he was also Watson Eminent Scholar in Biomedical Engineering and Microfabrication. .

He was also assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at Louisiana State University Medical Center, founding chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Science and Technology at the University of Pittsburgh, professor of neurology at the Stritch School of Medicine in Loyola University and a lecturer in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

During his career, Robinson has been responsible for the independent or collaborative development of over $20 million in grants funded by various private and federal granting agencies. He is the author of over 70 full publications and has edited 12 books, proceedings and special editions.

Robinson is a life member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and has held numerous positions within the institute, including corporate director, company president, and chairman of the development committee. members. He was the founding editor of IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering, and in 2001 received the prestigious IEEE Richard M. Emberson Award.

He is a member of numerous professional and community organizations and received the 2022 Outstanding Teaching Award from the St. Lawrence Chapter of the American Society for Engineering Education this spring, which also makes him eligible for a national award from the ASEE.

Robinson has also received numerous other honors and awards, including selection as a charter member of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering; initiation as an academician at the World Academy of Biomedical Technology of the United Nations Economic, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2004; and the St. Lawrence NYSARC Community Service Award. Robinson received the Purkynje Medal and a Solalem Honoris Causa degree from the Czech Association of Medical Sciences, as well as the 2006 Mentors Award from the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA). As a volunteer, organizer and conference presenter, Robinson has traveled to 38 countries and most of the United States.

He is a national administrator of the ALS Association (of Ice Bucket Challenge fame). Locally, he is a board member of the Upstate New York Chapter of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Association (ALSA). He helped strategically guide how the national association used its funds to promote research that could lead to a cure for the deadly disease, as well as provide care services for people with the disease and their carers. .

In the community, Robinson co-chairs an ALS Community Partner Golf Tournament held each August at the Highland Greens Golf Course in Brushton, NY. -one-year term as Secretary of State. He is also a commissioned lay minister for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Ogdensburg.

Robinson holds a doctorate in electrical engineering from Washington University in St. Loui, which he followed with a postdoctoral position in the Department of Anesthesiology at Yale University.

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Outstanding community service recognized by the Kiwanis Club of Homewood-Mountain Brook https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/outstanding-community-service-recognized-by-the-kiwanis-club-of-homewood-mountain-brook/ Fri, 13 May 2022 02:06:04 +0000 https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/outstanding-community-service-recognized-by-the-kiwanis-club-of-homewood-mountain-brook/ The Kiwanis Club of Homewood-Mountain Brook (KCOHMB) recently presented two Walter Zeller Distinguished Service Fellowships to the Homewood community. Members of the Graphos family received the medal and certificate awarded posthumously to Sammy Graphos, a fixture in Homewood’s main business district before his passing in October 2021. Owner/operator of Sam’s Super Samwiches, the influence and […]]]>

The Kiwanis Club of Homewood-Mountain Brook (KCOHMB) recently presented two Walter Zeller Distinguished Service Fellowships to the Homewood community.

Members of the Graphos family received the medal and certificate awarded posthumously to Sammy Graphos, a fixture in Homewood’s main business district before his passing in October 2021. Owner/operator of Sam’s Super Samwiches, the influence and Mr. Graphos’ wisdom has spread far beyond its walls. His son, Ted, has told many stories of Sam’s benevolence to children and adults in Rosedale and within schools in Homewood. KCOHMB members rejoiced at the news of the reopening of Sam’s Super Sandwiches under Ted’s direction in its new location in SOHO.

The second award honors the 37-year career of Ms. Deborah Fout, recently retired director of the Homewood Public Library. Under his leadership, more than $500,000 in improvements have seen the light of day, including exceptional programs for children and teens, adult services, and a state-of-the-art computer center. His service to Homewood, our region and the state is widely recognized. Kiwanis Alabama District Governor Scott Sims presented the award to Ms. Fout, surrounded by her close friends and library colleagues.

The Kiwanis International Walter Zeller Fellowship was established to fund The Eliminate Project, aimed at eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus in developing countries. KCOHMB shares this initiative by recognizing members of the community whose lives exemplify distinguished contributions and service.

Submitted by Leland Keller

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Memorial service set for Wayne Twp. firefighter who died on Tuesday https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/memorial-service-set-for-wayne-twp-firefighter-who-died-on-tuesday/ Wed, 11 May 2022 02:11:00 +0000 https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/memorial-service-set-for-wayne-twp-firefighter-who-died-on-tuesday/ Richard C. “Hank” Potter had been a member of the department for 22 years and served as a volunteer firefighter prior to his appointment. INDIANAPOLIS — Funeral to be held next week for 22-year-old veteran Wayne Township Firefighter who died on Tuesday. Richard C. “Hank” Potter was appointed to the Wayne Township Fire Department on […]]]>

Richard C. “Hank” Potter had been a member of the department for 22 years and served as a volunteer firefighter prior to his appointment.

INDIANAPOLIS — Funeral to be held next week for 22-year-old veteran Wayne Township Firefighter who died on Tuesday.

Richard C. “Hank” Potter was appointed to the Wayne Township Fire Department on December 27, 1999. He had volunteered with the service prior to his appointment.

Potter was most recently an engineer on Ladder 82.

A department spokesperson said Potter’s death was presumed due to cancer. He will receive full departmental honors as for all deaths in service.

He received several honors, including the Medal of Bravery, the Medal of Merit, the Community Service Award as well as seven Unit Honors.

Besides his fire service career, Potter was a member of the Indiana National Guard for 25 years, retiring with the rank of staff sergeant. He was proud of his combat tour in Afghanistan. He has won the Army Medal of Honor and Joint Meritorious Unit Award, Military Merit Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, NATO and various unit awards and ribbons.

Announcement of death in the line of duty for immediate release NAME: Richard C. “Hank” Potter Date of birth: December 07, 1969 NAMED:…

posted by Wayne Indianapolis Township Fire Department on Tuesday, May 10, 2022

Potter has also worked in civilian life, including as a firefighter at Rolls Royce. He was the head of the department’s Knox Key control system.

RELATED: Bargersville Firefighters Assist Woman Receiving Double Organ Transplant During Hospital Run

Hank was married to his wife, Gwyn, for 29 years, and they have three sons, Christopher, Caden and Reilley, all from Indianapolis.

In lieu of flowers, a memorial fund was established at the Indianapolis Firefighters Credit Union to help the family.

RELATED: ‘Emotional For All’ | IMPD officer meets with firefighters who saved his life after he was shot

The call is scheduled for May 19 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Great Hall, 400 N. High School Road. Services will follow at 1 p.m.

Potter’s funeral procession will pass through Station 82.

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Knoxville, known as Maker City, named #2 in the United States for artisans https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/knoxville-known-as-maker-city-named-2-in-the-united-states-for-artisans/ Mon, 09 May 2022 02:03:54 +0000 https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/knoxville-known-as-maker-city-named-2-in-the-united-states-for-artisans/ Siobian Jones has worked on cutting-edge stage productions all over the country, and it took moving to Knoxville to feel like she had finally found her creative home. “This is the first time in my artistic journey that I feel truly fulfilled,” Jones told Knox News. After working with Cirque Du Soleil in Las Vegas, […]]]>

Siobian Jones has worked on cutting-edge stage productions all over the country, and it took moving to Knoxville to feel like she had finally found her creative home.

“This is the first time in my artistic journey that I feel truly fulfilled,” Jones told Knox News.

After working with Cirque Du Soleil in Las Vegas, stage productions in Chicago and Utah, and with other theaters across the country as a custom wig artist and hairstylist, Jones returned to Knoxville there. three years old. The Maker City is garnering national attention because of his work and the design contributions of so many others.

Design sets recently named Knoxville the #2 city in the nation for crafts, thanks in part to a strong arts and crafts community.

But what makes Knoxville the perfect place for people like Jones?

Siobian Jones, owner of The Mighty Wig, works with the structural yarn she uses to make wigs.

Networking, support and determination to make Knoxville a better place for artists.

Uplifting Artists

When theaters closed at the start of the pandemic, Jones, 39, poured his money into launching The Mighty Wig. She makes custom and artistic wigs and does repairs. It’s a labor of love because a fully hand-tied wig can take around 200 hours to build.

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Berkeley City Council approves sweeping package to reinvent policing https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/berkeley-city-council-approves-sweeping-package-to-reinvent-policing/ Sat, 07 May 2022 00:33:45 +0000 https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/berkeley-city-council-approves-sweeping-package-to-reinvent-policing/ A majority of the Berkeley City Council on Thursday night approved a sweeping package of new programs and positions designed to transform public safety in Berkeley while helping to increase police numbers from an all-time low. Berkeleyside Live Coverage Council Highlights: Part 1 | Part 2 The council vote is a budget referral, meaning it […]]]>

A majority of the Berkeley City Council on Thursday night approved a sweeping package of new programs and positions designed to transform public safety in Berkeley while helping to increase police numbers from an all-time low.

Berkeleyside Live Coverage Council Highlights: Part 1 | Part 2

The council vote is a budget referral, meaning it will come back to officials in June for consideration as part of the upcoming budget process.

But if fully funded, the package — built on years of work by community members, managers and staff — would represent a major investment in what officials hope will result in an entirely new approach to community safety. .

The vision involves civilians responding to many of the calls the police are currently handling – those determined not to need an armed response – as well as the potential creation of a new community safety department, modeled after of one program in Albuquerque, to provide comprehensive oversight of the revamped system and consolidate a range of initiatives under one roof. The new umbrella agency would be a first in California, Mayor Jesse Arreguín said this week.

“With crime on the rise, don’t we want our police to focus more on gun violence, investigations and community policing?” Arreguín said Thursday night. “That’s why we offered to explore alternatives to policing.”

See the mayor’s presentation Thursday’s session

The reinvention package includes nearly $1 million in estimated consultant costs to help the city continue to analyze several efforts: BerkDOT, a civilian approach to certain types of traffic control ($300,000); the new Department of Community Safety ($250,000); potential changes to the Berkeley dispatch center ($200,000); and an analysis of BPD staffing ($70,000) to help determine how many police officers the city really needs.

The package also funds a comprehensive review of the city’s municipal code, estimated at $150,000, which could lead to Berkeley changing its approach to fines and fees to create fairer outcomes.

“The era of balancing your books on the backs of the poor must be coming to an end,” council member Ben Bartlett said.

The reinvention program also includes about $1 million in new city staff: $480,000 to create a new Office of Racial Equity and Diversity; $315,000 for a reinvention project coordinator; and $175,000 for a new employee position at Vision Zero to analyze traffic collision trends.

Learn about ongoing work related to Crisis Response, BerkDOT, and Dispatch

In addition, the program provides nearly $1.6 million in new funding for community organizations, ranging from violence prevention work and a behavioral health-focused crisis intervention model to fight against gender-based violence and linguistic equity.

That would be in addition to the $14 million the city already spends on community organizations, staff said.

Arreguín said the package could be funded from salary savings from vacant police positions, other General Fund dollars and, potentially, some sort of philanthropic support.

The city won’t need to spend all the money at once, he said, because work will be done in phases over several years.

The package also includes about $2.4 million to add police stations as well as civilian staff such as dispatchers and community service officers, which the ministry says are needed to manage the existing workload and reduce overtime costs.

“Berkeley is able to walk and chew gum at the same time,” Arreguín said Thursday night. “We can maintain support for our excellent police service, while taking a transformative and holistic approach to public safety. »

Initially, officials said they planned to wait until next month to vote on the police staffing issue. But several council members, who had proposed their own reinvention package, demanded that it be included as part of Thursday’s vote. In response, Arreguín made this funding commitment as an amendment to his original motion.

The BPD has approximately 150 officers and was permitted, until the COVID-19 pandemic, to have 181. During the pandemic, the city froze most municipal hiring and decided to keep 23 officer positions vacant in waiting for the process of reinvention. Current staffing levels have made it difficult for the BPD to fill patrols, leading to overtime costs and other issues, according to a recent city audit.

Councilor Lori Droste create a matrix compare the two proposals

Thursday evening, officials had two packages before them for consideration: one, from Mayor Arreguín and council members Kate Harrison, Ben Bartlett and Sophie Hahn; and the other, board members Terry Taplin, Lori Droste, Rashi Kesarwani and Susan Wengraf.

There was substantial overlap between the two packages, but the Taplin element did not include the new Department of Community Safety and totaled about $3 million in new funding requests, compared to what Droste said would add up. to $6 million in the mayor’s modified package.

Droste said the article she presented with Taplin and her colleagues also differed from the mayor’s article because it did not support a recommendation for the city to consider further expanding the type of calls to be diverted from the police towards civilians.

The city is already working to create a new specialist care unit to respond in place of the police to people in crisis and hopes to launch a pilot program later this year through a contract with an as yet undetermined community agency. The civilian unit could respond to calls related to everything from concerns about suicidal thoughts and wellness checks to drug overdoses, intoxicated persons and indecent exposure. Also on the list for a possible SCU response are suspicious circumstances, disruptions, intrusions and “social disorder”.

The recommendation in the mayor’s kit would examine how to expand the list to even more “low level” offences.

The council initially voted on the Taplin package, but it fell through in a 4–5 split, with council member Rigel Robinson voting to support the package proposed by Arreguín and his co-sponsors.

In the end, Droste and Kesarwani voted alone against the mayor’s package, citing concerns about whether the city would be able to adequately staff and fund so many new initiatives.

“I am delighted the Mayor has incorporated our request to unfreeze all BPD positions, hire a dispatch team and fully fund the Office of Racial Equity. This is a huge win for our community,” Droste said after the meeting. “I’m looking forward to June to see if we can actually fund it all. Hopefully we can, but I’m still worried.

Kesarwani said on Thursday evening that she was “worried that we haven’t established what the priority is”, adding: “I feel like we have put everything on the table and want to move everything forward.”

Wengraf said she, too, was concerned about money, especially in light of a new city audit published this week that put Berkeley without funding liabilities related to pension plans and retirees at more than $770 million and not funded infrastructure needs at $1.2 billion. However, she ultimately voted in favor of the mayor’s package.

Council members Harrison and Hahn said they hope the new efforts will help end the cycle of violence, reduce racial disparities and fix a system that is too burdensome for people already struggling to survive.

“We know that we need to invest more in crime prevention and social services, and those investments need to yield equitable results to address often gaping racial disparities,” Hahn told voters in a prepared statement earlier this week. “Many studies produced by the city – on health, education, housing, homelessness and other measures of social well-being – show a persistent trend: people of color, especially African Americans , have the worst results. If we are to reinvent public safety, we must also address these persistent disparities. »

Robinson said he believes the mayor’s package, including the Department of Community Safety, could enable systemic change in Berkeley that has the potential to create a clearer path for the “maze of change” the city is exploring. .

“Do we want to say just one thing that we said in 2020?” Robinson asked. “It’s not an easy question. I believe that this package is a major step in achieving this commitment.

Featured photo credit: Pete Rosos

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Area elementary students donate chemo care kits | News, Sports, Jobs https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/area-elementary-students-donate-chemo-care-kits-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 06:07:01 +0000 https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/area-elementary-students-donate-chemo-care-kits-news-sports-jobs/ DONATIONS given — Sophomores at Hills Elementary School presented 200 cancer care kits to representatives from the Tony Teramana Cancer Center to distribute to patients undergoing chemotherapy. Among those present were, from left, Marsha Lewis, Denise Mannarino and Catherine Poludniak of Trinity Health System and teacher and organizer Sarah Hibbits. MINGO […]]]>

DONATIONS given — Sophomores at Hills Elementary School presented 200 cancer care kits to representatives from the Tony Teramana Cancer Center to distribute to patients undergoing chemotherapy. Among those present were, from left, Marsha Lewis, Denise Mannarino and Catherine Poludniak of Trinity Health System and teacher and organizer Sarah Hibbits.

MINGO JUNCTION — Students from Hills and Cross Creek Elementary Schools are showing kindness by donating 200 chemo care kits to the Tony Teramana Cancer Center.

Sophomores gathered at Hills Elementary gymnasium on April 7 for a presentation to reps and provided colorful canvas tote bags filled with snacks, personal care items and games to provide chemo patients with a little comfort at home and at the establishment. Sarah Hibbits, a second-grade teacher, said the community service project had been running for seven years and more than 1,000 bags had been brought in during that time.

“There were 204 between Hills and Cross Creek”, she says, noting that she started her project when she was at the old Wintersville Elementary School. “The 200 will go to Teramana and four will immediately go to family and friends of chemo students and staff.”

Even COVID-19 concerns did not impact the acumen of the donation, although it did change plans during the school closure, but Hibbits said the community is responding in kind in the event. of need.

“Every year I always come to a point where I wonder if we’ll have enough,” she says. “We disseminated information on social networks and shared the project. When community members see the project, they want to help. »

This year, collections began in February and were extended to March due to snow days when items were still needed to fill the bags. The list of supplies included packaged snacks, bottled water, hard candies, lotion, travel size packs of wet wipes, Biotene or dry mouth products, travel size packs of tissues, blankets, hats and scarves, slippers, puzzle books and games, among others. The latest contributions have also filled a dozen additional boxes with supplies that the center can distribute when needed.

During the presentation, Hibbits said the generosity of students encourages patients and gives something back to the community. The students also shared their feelings about helping others and said it made them smile and hoped others would pay it forward.

“I’m grateful for what we do because I love helping people,” said sophomore Emerson Bates-Dallman.

“I feel good that we are trying to do something for others and it can go on and on and on,” added student Camdin Bell.

Meanwhile, representatives of cancer centers were also delighted with the outpouring of love.

“That’s wonderful,” said Marsha Lewis, an oncology attorney. “Patients love it and it brightens their day.”

Catherine Poludniak, director of the Trinity Health System Foundation, told the children that their efforts were having a huge impact.

“It’s fantastic. The community has always been supportive,” she added. “It’s heartwarming to see all of this and I really love seeing the kids get involved.”



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Tool Library Announced Spring 2022 Service Days https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/tool-library-announced-spring-2022-service-days/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 14:03:03 +0000 https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/tool-library-announced-spring-2022-service-days/ The Tool Library announces that it will put its tools and volunteers at the service of a new calendar of community service events, on April 23 and 30 and May 7, 14, 21 and 28. Each of the six service events provides an opportunity to beautify, strengthen and contribute to the WNY community through direct […]]]>

The Tool Library announces that it will put its tools and volunteers at the service of a new calendar of community service events, on April 23 and 30 and May 7, 14, 21 and 28. Each of the six service events provides an opportunity to beautify, strengthen and contribute to the WNY community through direct and practical action.

Even 3 inches of snow couldn’t stop volunteers from planting trees at the Tool Library’s Dewey Park last November!

This spring’s program includes cleaning up parks and pathways, planting community gardens in Buffalo’s University Heights and Kensington-Bailey neighborhoods, and stewarding newly planted trees along William Gaiter Parkway and in Dewey Park. . In addition to focusing on neighborhood improvement activities, The Tool Library’s service events also provide opportunities for volunteers to learn new skills, such as pruning, gardening, and tree planting. .

To register for a day of service and view the full schedule of events, visit thetoolollibrary.org/service.

For its final day of service on Saturday, May 28, The Tool Library will partner with the WNY Resource Council for its cleanup of Perkins Park. The Resource Council is the first winner of The Tool Library’s Nomination of a Project process. Neighbors and community organizations had the opportunity to submit a project to receive technical support and tools from The Tool Library team this spring.

“Our Days of Service are about more than just picking up trash or planting a tree,” said Darren Cotton, Chairman of The Tool Library, “they’re about reconnecting neighbors, harnessing the power of collective action to address quality of life issues, and building a culture of stewardship over the spaces we share.”

As part of this spring’s rollout, the Tool Library Board is also launching a new fundraising campaign to increase its number of monthly donors who help support these service events and provide tools for projects through WNY. You can help celebrate 50,000 borrowed tools by reaching the goal of 50 supporting donors this summer! The Tool Library Board will donate $50 for each new donor! To become a supported donor, visit: http://www.thetoollibrary.org/donate/

To date, Tool Library volunteers and partners have helped plant over 1,500 trees and over 10,000 tulip and daffodil bulbs in the city of Buffalo.

The Spring 2022 Days of Service are made possible through the support of National Grid and the offices of the Hon. Crystal Peoples-Stokes, Majority Leader, Hon. Lisa Chimera, 3rd District Legislator, and supporting donors from The Tool Library.

Photo credit: Zhi Ting Phua

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The athletic department hosts the annual year-end awards celebration https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/the-athletic-department-hosts-the-annual-year-end-awards-celebration/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 14:29:51 +0000 https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/the-athletic-department-hosts-the-annual-year-end-awards-celebration/ History links ROCHESTER, NY – The RIT Intercollegiate Athletics Department celebrated its annual Sports Awards celebration on Monday evening at the Ingle Auditorium. Below is the list of prizes along with the finalists for each (winners listed in fat). A. Stephen Walls Leadership Award Named in honor of the founder of the […]]]>

ROCHESTER, NY – The RIT Intercollegiate Athletics Department celebrated its annual Sports Awards celebration on Monday evening at the Ingle Auditorium.

Below is the list of prizes along with the finalists for each (winners listed in fat).

A. Stephen Walls Leadership Award

Named in honor of the founder of the RIT Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame, the award is presented annually to a student-athlete who demonstrates outstanding leadership qualities and team activities, the athletics program as a whole and the campus community as a whole.

Margaret Carey – Women’s rowing
Dan Shaw – Rowing Men
Jordan Marchais – Female hockey
Kiana Walker – Women’s volleyball
Jake Wolicki – Tennis Men

Dr. Bill Destler Community Service Award

Named in honor of RIT’s ninth president and a strong supporter of intercollegiate athletics, the award is designed to recognize the outstanding community service efforts of our student-athletes and teams in the community and beyond.

Women’s basketball team
Women’s soccer team
Sarah Henetta – Women’s basketball
Tommy Moore – Rowing Men

Coaches Appreciation Award

Awarded to an individual who has made a significant contribution to the intercollegiate athletics program, giving of their time and energy for the betterment of the department.

ryan kelly – Strength and Conditioning Coach
Jeff Siegel – Deputy Director of Athletics
Star travel

Power Den Rewards

Two student-athletes are recognized each year for demonstrating a high level of skill in the weight room and for having an enthusiasm for training while going above and beyond the demands of the program in their preparation.

Matt Ciminelli – Swimming & Diving
Matthew Funicelli – Male athletics
Stephen Ketelsen – Men’s lacrosse
Pierre Stefos – Male athletics

Maddy Bullis – Women’s football
Myranda D’Antico – Women’s lacrosse
Alyssa Juergens – Women’s basketball
Hannah Tumble – Soft ball

Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) Appreciation Award

The SAAC Appreciation Award annually recognizes an individual, group or department that continually strives to improve the overall student-athlete experience.

Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement
Jacqueline Nicholson – Executive Sports Director
Nathan Parker – Wrestling
Amy Rose – Women’s basketball coach

Jan Strine Award

The Athletic Department annually recognizes a group or individual for being an Outstanding Friend of Athletics and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf Communities who has helped to strengthen the relationship and mutual support between the two. The award is named in memory of longtime NTID professor Jan Strine, who died in 2013.

Tiana Hose – Cheerleading
David Crohn – NTID Athletic Services Interpretation Coordinator
Alisa Supplee-Baxter – NTID Associate Interpreter

Cultural Competence and Social Justice Award

Awarded to a student-athlete who has demonstrated a superior commitment to promoting diversity, equity, inclusion, and cultural competence within RIT Athletics and the campus community.

Holland Gillis – Women’s basketball
Phoebe Huey – Women’s Swimming and Diving
KhaVy Sangasy – Women’s Swimming and Diving

Team Academic Award

Awarded to the intercollegiate athletic team with the highest cumulative grade point average.

3rd – Women’s Volleyball 3.632
2nd – Women’s Cross Country 3.656
1st – Women’s Soccer 3,691

Dr. Mark Ellingson Award

Named for the former RIT wrestling coach who became its fifth president, Ellingson Award nominees are considered based on a combination of high achievement in the classroom and on the playing field.

Alexei Bingham – Men’s cross-country/athletics
Patrick Blackal – Baseball
Nick John – Male athletics

Anne Byerley – Women’s cross-country/athletics
Katie Hobler – Women’s volleyball
Alyssa Juergens – Women’s basketball
Morgan Monteith – Women’s football

Senior Athletes of the Year
Awarded based on overall career athletic achievement over the past four years.



ryan barnable – Men’s lacrosse

Jake Michalski – Rowing Men

Kaidon Winters – Wrestling



Marissa Dispenza – Women’s athletics

Katie Hobler – Women’s volleyball
Morgan Montieth – Women’s Soccer



All Tiger Teams
Presented to individuals across the department who have stood out in the past academic year in their respective seasons.



Grave

Alexei Bingham – Men’s cross-country

Christine Cataldo Smith – Women’s football

Katie Cobos – Women’s cross-country

Randy Dickersbach – Men’s soccer

Taylor Higgins – Women’s volleyball



Winter

Tyler Hulse – Male athletics

Nick John – Male athletics

Kaleesha Joseph – Women’s basketball

Austin Lamb – Wrestling

KhaVy Sangasy – Women’s Swimming and Diving

Zach Stedeford – Wrestling

Dan Willette – Men’s hockey



Spring

Marley Angus – Men’s lacrosse

ryan barnable – Men’s lacrosse

Marissa Dispenza – Women’s athletics

Taylor Jensen – Men’s lacrosse

Ian Libby – Baseball

Aldyn Savage – Women’s lacrosse

Hannah Tumble – Soft ball



All Rookie

Sarah Coe female hockey

Emily DiMarco – Women’s athletics

Josh Harkless – Wrestling

Gellert Kish – Male swimming and diving

Jaden Longdon – Men’s soccer

Sidney Neff – Women’s volleyball

Anna Pechenko – Women’s Swimming and Diving

Ben Sheehan – Men’s Athletics

Emma Waite – Women’s basketball

Carter Wilkie – Men’s hockey

 

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KVCC names college building after former president Woodlee https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/kvcc-names-college-building-after-former-president-woodlee/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 12:39:08 +0000 https://solidaridadyvoluntariado.org/kvcc-names-college-building-after-former-president-woodlee/ Barbara Woodlee, the longtime former president of Kennebec Valley Community College, stands Friday outside the Fairfield campus building named in her honor. Michael G. Seamans / Morning Watchman FAIRFIELD — Kennebec Valley Community College announced it was naming a college building in honor of Barbara W. Woodlee, who served as school president from 1984 to […]]]>

Barbara Woodlee, the longtime former president of Kennebec Valley Community College, stands Friday outside the Fairfield campus building named in her honor. Michael G. Seamans / Morning Watchman

FAIRFIELD — Kennebec Valley Community College announced it was naming a college building in honor of Barbara W. Woodlee, who served as school president from 1984 to 2012.

A dedication ceremony for Woodlee Hall is scheduled for Monday, with remarks from Woodlee and other speakers from KVCC and the Maine Community College System.

Woodlee said Friday she was “shocked” when college officials broke the news to her a few weeks ago.

“It was beautiful and totally unexpected,” Woodlee said. “And it’s just an amazing honor and, really, for me, a humbling experience.”

Karen Normandin, acting president of KVCC, said that when she started having conversations about the building’s name, Woodlee’s name kept coming up. And when Normandin went to the administrators of the community college system, they fully supported the decision.

“We thought this was a really great way for us to recognize the contribution she has made to this college in particular, and to the community college system in general,” Normandin said.

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Barbara Woodlee, former longtime president of Kennebec Valley Community College, stands Friday outside the Fairfield campus building named in her honor. Michael G. Seamans / Morning Watchman

The building on the college’s Harold Alfond campus in Fairfield was completed in 2015. It includes classrooms, lecture halls and science labs, Normandin said. It had no official name until now and was often referred to as the Science Building or the Science and Agriculture Building.

Woodlee served as college president from 1984 to 2012 and oversaw much of the growth during her time there. When she started as president, the college was known as Kennebec Valley Vocational Technical Institute, then it became Kennebec Valley Technical College, and finally Kennebec Valley Community College.

Woodlee guided a variety of projects during his time at KVCC and oversaw the donation of 700 acres of land to the Harold Alfond Foundation’s Maine Community College System in 2012 – which eventually became the Harold Alfond Campus.

She was inducted into the Maine Women’s Hall of Fame in 2015 and received a Distinguished Community Service Award from the Mid Maine Chamber of Commerce in 1997, a Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of Maine Farmington and a Citation of Achievement from the American Association of University. Women.

Woodlee announced his retirement from KVCC in 2010 but remained until a replacement was found, which was Richard Hopper. But she didn’t go far and worked for the Maine Community College System until 2015.

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She is out of school and several years ago moved with her husband to Virginia Beach, Virginia.

When asked to reflect on his time at KVCC, Woodlee thanked the people who worked alongside him to make the college’s growth possible – business people, graduates, professors, grantmakers and others.

“When I look at all of this together, there are so many people who have really, really contributed to the success of this institution,” Woodlee said.

It’s a bit of a full loop moment. Normandin held various positions at KVCC for over 30 years and worked closely with Woodlee. Normandin is now acting president and introduces Woodlee Hall to her former boss.

Normandin said she remembers Woodlee’s passion for community and all the work she did to get involved in the community around KVCC.

“The other thing I always remember about her is how supportive she was of me,” Normandin said. “I don’t think I would be where I am today without his influence.”

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